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dc.contributor.advisorPauley, Patricia M.
dc.contributor.authorSauer, Erika Lauren.
dc.dateDecember 1995
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-29T22:50:11Z
dc.date.available2013-04-29T22:50:11Z
dc.date.issued1995-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/31374
dc.description.abstractQuantitative predictions of surface extratropical cyclone development are correlated to the degree of upper-level forcing from 500 mb vorticity advection and 300 mb divergence. Although it is difficult to obtain an accurate analysis of upper-level divergence, modern models and data assimilation procedures do produce consistent divergence fields. The divergence field partitioned into the longitudinal (alongstream) and transverse (cross-stream) components approximately estimates the effect of curvature and jet streaks on cyclone intensification. Verification of the Eta model indicated not significant difference in the mean central pressure to a confidence level of 95%, and verification of the 300 mb divergence was very similar to the 500 mb vorticity advection. The presence of subgeostrophic flow in the trough and supergeostrophic flow in the ridge was noted with the longitudinal divergence. Large variability in longitudinal divergence reflected some sensitivity to small-scale perturbations in the height field. Transverse divergence showed greater consistency and projected a similar wind pattern to the classic jet streak model, however, modifications were seen as ageostrophic winds may also be directed toward regions of height falls. The composition of the total divergence from the longitudinal and transverse divergence is about 50:50. However, with very large total divergence values, the dominant contributor is the transverse divergence.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/theeffectofmbdiv1094531374
dc.format.extent120 p.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. As such, it is in the public domain, and under the provisions of Title 17, United States Code, Section 105, may not be copyrighted.en_US
dc.titleThe effect of 300 mb divergence on surface cyclogenesisen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentMeteorology and Physical Oceanography
dc.description.funderNAen_US
dc.description.recognitionNAen_US
dc.description.serviceU.S. Navy (U.S.N.) author.en_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameM.S. in Meteorology and Physical Oceanographyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineMeteorology and Physical Oceanographyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US


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