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dc.contributor.advisorGuttieri, Karen
dc.contributor.advisorSimons, Anna
dc.contributor.authorSellers, Cameron S.
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-14T17:37:35Z
dc.date.available2012-03-14T17:37:35Z
dc.date.issued2007-09
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/3195
dc.description.abstractProvincial Reconstruction Teams (PRTs) are currently prominent constructs for stabilization and reconstruction in Afghanistan and Iraq. PRTs are composed of civil-military teams, including elements from coalition partners and the host-nation, and involve multiple military services and civilian agencies. Their missions are to extend the legitimacy of the central government throughout the country and to use Civil Military Operations (CMO) to counter anti-government forces. PRTs are prominent, but controversial. Nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) complain that the U.S. military blurs the lines between humanitarian assistance and military operations. Other critics have called PRTs interagency failures because the U.S. Department of State (DOS), the Department of Defense (DoD), and other government agencies have not contributed the personnel, resources, or training required to make PRTs operationally functional. The result is both lack of integration and of effectiveness. The purpose of this thesis is to determine how to make PRTs more effective in the future. While host-nation participation is necessary for success, this thesis will focus only on the controversies involving NGOs and interagency communities. These include humanitarian space, general attributes, and effectiveness of PRTs. The policy prescription for future PRTs is found in the concept of a Civil Military Operations Center (CMOC), which is described in U.S. Army's FM 3-05.40, Civil Affairs Operations. The core tasks of a CMOC, especially those of Civil Information Management (CIM), are designed to accomplish a variety of missions relating to Post-Conflict Reconstruction (PCR). They would serve well as foundational components of a PRT. Also, because of the interagency nature of PRTs, commanders of these teams must have the right character and skill sets to operate in this complex environment.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/provincialrecons109453195
dc.format.extentxiv,123 p. : ill. ;en_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsApproved for public release, distribution unlimiteden_US
dc.subject.lcshNon-governmental organizationsen_US
dc.subject.lcshInternational agenciesen_US
dc.subject.lcshBureaucracyen_US
dc.subject.lcshCivil engineeringen_US
dc.subject.lcshStructural engineeringen_US
dc.subject.lcshHumanitarian assistanceen_US
dc.titleProvincial reconstruction teams improving effectivenessen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School (U.S.)
dc.description.serviceUS Army Reserve (USAR) author.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc695994123
etd.thesisdegree.nameM.S. in Defense Analysisen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameM.A. in Security Studiesen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineDefense Analysisen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineSecurity Studies (Security Stabilization and Reconstruction)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
etd.verifiednoen_US


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