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dc.contributor.advisorHalladay, Carolyn
dc.contributor.authorBock, Adam R.
dc.dateMar-13
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-08T20:41:31Z
dc.date.available2013-05-08T20:41:31Z
dc.date.issued2013-03
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/32795
dc.description.abstractThis thesis examines post-conflict justice in Iraq following the U.S. invasion, specifically, the legitimacy of the Iraq High Criminal Court and its first deliberation, the Al-Dujail trial of Saddam Hussein. It asks How can the United States infuse transitional justice through Western forms of judicial procedures into the democratic transition of non- Western nations under U.S. military occupation The analysis begins with International Military Tribunal at Nuremberg as a model of transformative post-conflict justice. Then it turns to the cloudier legacy of the Tokyo Trials, where the internal contradictions of this approach gathered force in the non-Western context and laid bare the shortcomings of the Nuremberg model. Finally, it examines the Iraqi tribunal, which demonstrated many of the shortcomings of earlier tribunals, to the detriment of the United States and the new Iraqi government. This thesis does not concern itself with the guilt or innocence of the former Iraqi dictator. The purpose is to better understand how the Coalition Provisional Authority established legal jurisdiction and to review the issues surrounding Saddams trial. Finally, it suggests judicial processes that could be employed in non-Western cultures to support the transition from an insurgent post-conflict environment to peace.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/establishingpost1094532795
dc.publisherMonterey, California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined
in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. As such, it is in the
public domain, and under the provisions of Title 17, United States
Code, Section 105, is not copyrighted in the U.S.en_US
dc.titleESTABLISHING POST-CONFLICT JUSTICE THROUGH U.S. OCCUPATION: MILITARY TRIBUNALS AS A MEANS OF TRANSITIONAL JUSTICEen_US
dc.contributor.secondreaderDahl, Erik
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs
dc.subject.authorTransitional Justiceen_US
dc.subject.authorJusticeen_US
dc.subject.authorTribunalen_US
dc.subject.authorSaddamen_US
dc.subject.authorHusseinen_US
dc.subject.authorAl-Dujailen_US
dc.subject.authorNurembergen_US
dc.subject.authorIMTen_US
dc.subject.authorTokyoen_US
dc.subject.authorTransformative Justiceen_US
dc.subject.authorIraqi Special Tribunalen_US
dc.subject.authorHigh Criminal Courten_US
dc.subject.authorpost-conflicten_US
dc.subject.authorreconciliationen_US
dc.subject.authorvictors justiceen_US
dc.subject.authorCPAen_US
dc.subject.authorISTen_US
dc.subject.authorIHCCen_US
dc.subject.authorIMT-FEen_US
dc.subject.authorMilitary Tribunalen_US
dc.subject.authorCivil Military Relationsen_US
dc.subject.authorCiv-Mil Relationsen_US
dc.subject.authorTruth Commissionen_US
dc.subject.authorTrialen_US
dc.subject.authorIraqen_US
dc.subject.authorIraqi.en_US
dc.description.recognitionOutstanding Thesisen_US
dc.description.serviceMajor, United States Armyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster Of Arts In Security Studies (Homeland Security And Defense)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineSecurity Studies (Homeland Security And Defense)en_US
dc.description.distributionstatementApproved for public release; distribution is unlimited.


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