International mediation and negotiating positions of Cyprus' regional conflict after the 1974 Turkish invasion: Obstacles and prospects to a settlement

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Authors
Alexopoulos, Konstantinos.
Subjects
NA
Advisors
Eyre, Dana P.
Roessler, Tjarck
Date of Issue
2000-06
Date
Publisher
Monterey, California. Naval Postgraduate School
Language
en_US
Abstract
Cyprus represents one of the most enduring and problematic regional conflicts. Since Cyprus' independence in 1960, the Greek and the Turkish Cypriots have been in conflict, culminating in the arrival of the UN Peace- keeping Force (UNFICYP) in 1964 and the 1974 Turkish invasion. The regional concerns of Greece and Turkey and their proclivity to protect and advance the interests of their related ethnic communities on the island have played serious roles in the maintenance of the conflict. The thesis illustrates the weakness of the international mediation effort and the obstacles to a settlement. Although third parties, such as the UN, the USA and the EU, are pressing the issue, a solution ultimately depends on the four key actors, the two Cypriot communities and Greece and Turkey, coming to a mutually acceptable agreement. More recently, the EU has become involved in the issue because of the intended accession negotiations for Cyprus, and its special relations with Greece - as an EU member - and Turkey, as an EU-membership candidate following the 1999 EU summit in Helsinki. Both the EU and USA calculate that a political federal solution of Cyprus' problems will benefit both Cypriot communities, improve Greek-Turkish relations, and formalize Turkey's European status.
Type
Thesis
Description
Series/Report No
Department
National Security Affairs
Organization
Naval Postgraduate School (U.S.)
Identifiers
NPS Report Number
Sponsors
Funder
NA
Format
xviii, 127 p.;maps:28 cm.
Citation
Distribution Statement
Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited.
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