Integrated stability : Northeast Asian security for the new millennium

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Authors
Erickson, Michael R.
Subjects
National Interests
United States
China
Japan
Russian Far East
Korean Peninsula
Multilateral Security Arrangements
Northeast Asian Security
ASEAN
ARF
APEC
CSCAP
Advisors
Buss, Claude A.
Date of Issue
1994-12
Date
December 1994
Publisher
Monterey, California : Naval Postgraduate School
Language
Abstract
With the end of the Cold War alignment paradigm, Asian states have lost, or perceive the threat of losing their political patrons. In lieu of traditional alliances, many states are embracing multilateral security arrangements. Placing an increased emphasis on economic security instead of military security. These states appear to be ranking economic development ahead of traditional security concerns. By focusing on economic growth, these nations would seem to be subordinating military security as a matter of foreign policy. To this end, nations in the region are increasingly viewing multilateral arrangements as a means to effect cooperative ventures. The Cold War strategies of nuclear deterrence, military predominance,and cooperation within the U.N. and within other bilateral alliances no longer adequately address America's national interests. In the rapidly evolving security environment, the United States is called upon to reaffirm these interests and to formulate additional policies to meet the challenge of a rapidly changing international environment. The need for a nuclear deterrent continues. The end of the Cold War and the budgetary restraints of the United States calls for a limited downsizing of American military capabilities. The increasing importance of economic factors in the security equation, particularly the proliferation of transnational organizations, shows clearly the need for a greater degree of multilateralization-both in political and economic activities. The United States watches closely the proliferation of multilateral institutions in North America, Europe, Northeast and Southeast Asia.
Type
Thesis
Description
Series/Report No
Department
National Security Affairs (NSA)
Organization
Identifiers
NPS Report Number
Sponsors
Funder
Format
x, 148 p. ;|c28 cm.
Citation
Distribution Statement
Rights
This publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.
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