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dc.contributor.advisorBuss, Claude A.
dc.contributor.authorErickson, Michael R.
dc.dateDecember 1994
dc.date.accessioned2013-06-20T18:29:24Z
dc.date.available2013-06-20T18:29:24Z
dc.date.issued1994-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/34069
dc.description.abstractWith the end of the Cold War alignment paradigm, Asian states have lost, or perceive the threat of losing their political patrons. In lieu of traditional alliances, many states are embracing multilateral security arrangements. Placing an increased emphasis on economic security instead of military security. These states appear to be ranking economic development ahead of traditional security concerns. By focusing on economic growth, these nations would seem to be subordinating military security as a matter of foreign policy. To this end, nations in the region are increasingly viewing multilateral arrangements as a means to effect cooperative ventures. The Cold War strategies of nuclear deterrence, military predominance,and cooperation within the U.N. and within other bilateral alliances no longer adequately address America's national interests. In the rapidly evolving security environment, the United States is called upon to reaffirm these interests and to formulate additional policies to meet the challenge of a rapidly changing international environment. The need for a nuclear deterrent continues. The end of the Cold War and the budgetary restraints of the United States calls for a limited downsizing of American military capabilities. The increasing importance of economic factors in the security equation, particularly the proliferation of transnational organizations, shows clearly the need for a greater degree of multilateralization-both in political and economic activities. The United States watches closely the proliferation of multilateral institutions in North America, Europe, Northeast and Southeast Asia.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/integratedstabil1094534069
dc.format.extentx, 148 p. ;|c28 cm.en_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California : Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. As such, it is in the public domain, and under the provisions of Title 17, United States Code, Section 105, may not be copyrighted.en_US
dc.titleIntegrated stability : Northeast Asian security for the new millenniumen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.secondreaderOlsen, Edward A.
dc.contributor.schoolSchool for International Graduate Studies
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs (NSA)
dc.subject.authorNational Interestsen_US
dc.subject.authorUnited Statesen_US
dc.subject.authorChinaen_US
dc.subject.authorJapanen_US
dc.subject.authorRussian Far Easten_US
dc.subject.authorKorean Peninsulaen_US
dc.subject.authorMultilateral Security Arrangementsen_US
dc.subject.authorNortheast Asian Securityen_US
dc.subject.authorASEANen_US
dc.subject.authorARFen_US
dc.subject.authorAPECen_US
dc.subject.authorCSCAPen_US
dc.description.serviceLieutenant Commander, United States Navyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameM.A in National Security Affairsen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineNational Securityen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US


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