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dc.contributor.authorPiombo, Jessica
dc.contributor.authorDearing, Matthew
dc.contributor.authorJordt, Gustav
dc.contributor.authorNeal, Jason
dc.contributor.authorPerazzola, Laura
dc.date9-Mar-12
dc.date.accessioned2013-07-17T22:30:42Z
dc.date.available2013-07-17T22:30:42Z
dc.date.issued2012-03-09
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/34342
dc.descriptionApproved for public display, distribution unlimiteden_US
dc.description.abstract"The workshop titled Reducing Insecurity in 'Africa: Roles and Responsibilities of the U.S. Military, U.S. Government and Non-Government Communities' was held in Monterey, California in December 2010. Sponsored by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency and hosted by the Naval Postgraduate School, this conference focused on the respective roles of military, government civilian, and non-governmental actors in bridging security and development processes in Africa. We organized this conference because of the debates that had been ignited over the creation of the United States Africa Command (AFRICOM) in February 2007. An expansive conception of security and the roles that military actors should take in providing security informed the early deliberations over AFRICOM's roles and missions. AFRICOM's creators proclaimed that it would be a new kind of combatant command, one that took a 'whole of government' approach to Africa, and one in which the Department of Defense (DoD) working in close collaboration with the Department of State (DoS), United States Agency for International Development (USAID), and other partners. AFRICOM would engage in a wide range of activities that extended far beyond the narrow confines of national security, and it would attempt to take an extremely proactive stance in responding to and working with African concerns. To AFRICOM, security included not just the traditional concepts of state-centric national security conceived of in military terms (arms rivalries, strategic alliances, defense and military training), but also dimensions of human security: individual security and human rights, economic prosperity, societal reconstruction and stabilization, regional organization development, and capacity building for states and their institutions."en_US
dc.description.sponsorship2012 005en_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleReducing Insecurity in Africa; Roles and Responsibilities of the U.S. Military, U.S. Government, and Non-Governmental Communitiesen_US
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs


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