Publication:
Experimental Verification of Attitude Control Techniques for Slew Maneuvers of Flexible Spacecraft

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Authors
Hailey, J.
Sortun, C.
Agrawal, B.N.
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Advisors
Date of Issue
1992
Date
August 10-12, 1992
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Language
Abstract
This paper presents experimental verification of modern and classical control laws on flexible spacecraft structures. The Flexible Spacecraft Simulator at the Naval Postgraduate School is designed to test a variety of control theory on a two-dimensional representation of an antenna at the end of a low-frequency astromast. The Simulator represents motion about the pitch axis and is restricted to rotatation only. Control laws are implemented through a momentum wheel mounted on the rigid main body. Feedback is obtained through a rotary variable differential transformer (RVDT) which senses the body's rotation angle and a rate-gyro giving body rate. The analytical model contains the linearized equations of motion accounting for the flexible dynamics. Slewing maneuvers are conducted for positioning the main body by using proportional- derivative (PD), torque profiles and optimal controllers. No active control is applied to the flexible structure. A new technique for state estimation is developed for the optimal controller since the standard estimation methods prove to be unsatisfactory. In all cases, the experimental results are in close agreement with the analytical predictions. This paper presents experimental verification of modern and classical control laws on flexible spacecraft structures. The Flexible Spacecraft Simulator at the Naval Postgraduate School is designed to test a variety of control theory on a two-dimensional representation of an antenna at the end of a low-frequency astromast. The Simulator represents motion about the pitch axis and is restricted to rotatation only. Control laws are implemented through a momentum wheel mounted on the rigid main body. Feedback is obtained through a rotary variable differential transformer (RVDT) which senses the body's rotation angle and a rate-gyro giving body rate. The analytical model contains the linearized equations of motion accounting for the flexible dynamics. Slewing maneuvers are conducted for positioning the main body by using proportional- derivative (PD), torque profiles and optimal controllers. No active control is applied to the flexible structure. A new technique for state estimation is developed for the optimal controller since the standard estimation methods prove to be unsatisfactory. In all cases, the experimental results are in close agreement with the analytical predictions. This paper presents experimental verification of modern and classical control laws on flexible spacecraft structures. The Flexible Spacecraft Simulator at the Naval Postgraduate School is designed to test a variety of control theory on a two-dimensional representation of an antenna at the end of a low-frequency astromast. The Simulator represents motion about the pitch axis and is restricted to rotatation only. Control laws are implemented through a momentum wheel mounted on the rigid main body. Feedback is obtained through a rotary variable differential transformer (RVDT) which senses the body's rotation angle and a rate-gyro giving body rate. The analytical model contains the linearized equations of motion accounting for the flexible dynamics. Slewing maneuvers are conducted for positioning the main body by using proportional- derivative (PD), torque profiles and optimal controllers. No active control is applied to the flexible structure. A new technique for state estimation is developed for the optimal controller since the standard estimation methods prove to be unsatisfactory. In all cases, the experimental results are in close agreement with the analytical predictions. This paper presents experimental verification of modern and classical control laws on flexible spacecraft structures. The Flexible Spacecraft Simulator at the Naval Postgraduate School is designed to test a variety of control theory on a two-dimensional representation of an antenna at the end of a low-frequency astromast. The Simulator represents motion about the pitch axis and is restricted to rotatation only. Control laws are implemented through a momentum wheel mounted on the rigid main body. Feedback is obtained through a rotary variable differential transformer (RVDT) which senses the body's rotation angle and a rate-gyro giving body rate. The analytical model contains the linearized equations of motion accounting for the flexible dynamics. Slewing maneuvers are conducted for positioning the main body by using proportional- derivative (PD), torque profiles and optimal controllers. No active control is applied to the flexible structure. A new technique for state estimation is developed for the optimal controller since the standard estimation methods prove to be unsatisfactory. In all cases, the experimental results are in close agreement with the analytical predictions.
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Description
The article of record as published may be found at http://dx.doi.org/10.2514/6.1992-4456
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Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
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AIAA Guidance, Navigation, and Control Conference, Hilton Head, SC, August 10-12, 1992.
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This publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined
in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. As such, it is in the
public domain, and under the provisions of Title 17, United States
Code, Section 105, is not copyrighted in the U.S.
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