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dc.contributor.advisorArquilla, John
dc.contributor.advisorCamber, Warren, T.
dc.contributor.authorCunningham, Sean W.
dc.dateJun-13
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-01T16:51:31Z
dc.date.available2013-08-01T16:51:31Z
dc.date.issued2013-06
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/34651
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution is unlimiteden_US
dc.description.abstractInformation and communication technologies (ICT), like all technologies, are catalysts for political change and potential conflict. The Internet effect continues to fuel the explosive growth of ICT, and has enduring implications. It has sparked the long fuse of an Information Revolutionand a Social Network Revolution. This revolutionary wave is fundamentally altering both the structure of institutional arrangements and the behavior of bureaucratic organizations by transforming traditional tactics for organizing, communicating, collaborating, and participating in the political system. Does the accelerated rate of systemic change caused by the Internet effect create social cohesion, or cleavages that may lead to increased conflict? The purpose of this study is to determine, by qualitative as well as quantitative means, whether a causal relationship exists between the degree a society is connected via social media networks (Internet and the World Wide Web [WWW]) and the institutional capacities of central governance. Blending theory with data, a statistical regression model is developed to evaluate the degree and measure the magnitude of this relationship. The findings gleaned from this analysis suggest that a conditional causal relationship does exist between social connectivity and state capacity.en_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. As such, it is in the public domain, and under the provisions of Title 17, United States Code, Section 105, may not be copyrighted.en_US
dc.titleGlobal connectivity and government capacity: social networks, order, change, and conflicten_US
dc.contributor.departmentDefense Analysis
dc.subject.authorCleavagesen_US
dc.subject.authorConflicten_US
dc.subject.authorCultureen_US
dc.subject.authorEmpirical Modelen_US
dc.subject.authorGlobalismen_US
dc.subject.authorGovernanceen_US
dc.subject.authorIndustrialismen_US
dc.subject.authorModernizationen_US
dc.subject.authorMultivariate Linear Regressionen_US
dc.subject.authorOrdinary Least-Squareen_US
dc.subject.authorPanel- Corrected Standard Erroren_US
dc.subject.authorPanel Dataen_US
dc.subject.authorPolitical Changeen_US
dc.subject.authorSocial Connectivityen_US
dc.subject.authorState Capacityen_US
dc.subject.authorStatistical Modelen_US
dc.subject.authorTransformation.en_US
dc.description.serviceMajor, United States Armyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Science in Defense Analysisen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineDefense Analysisen_US


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