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dc.contributor.advisorDahl, Erik J.
dc.contributor.authorCurtis, Wesley R.
dc.dateJun-13
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-01T16:51:32Z
dc.date.available2013-08-01T16:51:32Z
dc.date.issued2013-06
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/34652
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution is unlimiteden_US
dc.description.abstractDespite NATOs long history of close military cooperation and coordination, the Alliance cannot fully support major multinational operations. Tested by conflicts in the 1990s through to the recent war in Libya, NATO capabilities have consistently fallen short. During each conflict, intelligence played a key role in securing victory, but NATOs operational successes were made possible only through substantial U.S. intelligence support. The lack of an independent NATO intelligence capability presents a problem for the United States, which needs a NATO capable of conducting operations in the event of a simultaneous conflict in another region. Given the rise of austerity measures in Europe, it is unlikely that European governments will provide additional funding to establish a comprehensive NATO intelligence capability. Therefore, the U.S. should establish an enhanced intelligence-sharing relationship with NATO to offset the paucity of NATO intelligence support and operational resources. Intelligence sharing can increase international cooperation and allow for greater burden sharing among allies. This is most aptly demonstrated by the United Kingdom-U.S.A. (UKUSA) series of signals intelligence agreements developed during World War II, which arguably provided the foundation for the special relationship between the U.S. and the U.K. today.en_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. As such, it is in the public domain, and under the provisions of Title 17, United States Code, Section 105, may not be copyrighted.en_US
dc.titleA "special relationship": bridging the NATO intelligence gapen_US
dc.contributor.secondreaderTucker, David C.
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs
dc.subject.authorNATOen_US
dc.subject.authorintelligenceen_US
dc.subject.authorintelligence-sharingen_US
dc.subject.authorliaisonen_US
dc.subject.authorUKUSAen_US
dc.subject.authorsignals intelligenceen_US
dc.subject.authorSIGINTen_US
dc.description.serviceLieutenant, United States Navyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Arts In Security Studies (Europe And Eurasia)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineSecurity Studies (Europe And Eurasia)en_US


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