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dc.contributor.advisorArquilla, John
dc.contributor.advisorSimons, Anna
dc.contributor.authorHansen, William G.
dc.dateJun-13
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-01T16:51:38Z
dc.date.available2013-08-01T16:51:38Z
dc.date.issued2013-06
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/34673
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution is unlimiteden_US
dc.description.abstractDuring the Korean War, Chinese captors of U.S. prisoners employed an unexpected and relatively successful compliance program. The Chinese, somewhat afraid of post-conflict repercussions for coercive torture, pursued techniques of social influence to secure behavioral compliance as well as lasting indoctrination. Although they failed in their primary objective to permanently alter beliefs and attitudes, their process illuminated the success in influencing individual behavior by interpreting and controlling aspects of group social dynamics. To cope with the daily flood of lifes information, humans have developed cognitive processes to quickly filter decision-making requests according to probable importance. If determined routine, the person allows learned decision-making shortcuts to guide his response. A range of psycho-social principles of human behavior underlie this automaticity and they can be deliberately triggered, or suppressed, to increase the likelihood of generating predictable behavioral responses in an individual. This thesis includes a broad survey of the major theoretical and practical foundations of psychology, propaganda, and marketing. It identifies the psycho-social principles that most influence a persons likelihood of complying with behavioral requests and examines a broad selection of social influence efforts for their presence. Finally, this thesis concludes by assessing the ability of influence principles to secure enduring effects.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/influenceoryndpr1094534673
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleInfluence: theory and practiceen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentDefense Analysis (DA)
dc.subject.authorComplianceen_US
dc.subject.authorPersuasionen_US
dc.subject.authorInfluenceen_US
dc.subject.authorPropagandaen_US
dc.subject.authorHeuristicsen_US
dc.subject.authorSocial Impact Theoryen_US
dc.subject.authorCybernetic Theoryen_US
dc.subject.authorChange Theoryen_US
dc.subject.authorAttitude Change Theoryen_US
dc.subject.authorReflexive Control Theoryen_US
dc.subject.authorMarketingen_US
dc.subject.authorAutomaticityen_US
dc.subject.authorPsychological Principlesen_US
dc.subject.authorPerception Biasen_US
dc.subject.authorJudgment Biasen_US
dc.subject.authorHabit Formationen_US
dc.subject.authorBehavior Modificationen_US
dc.subject.authorIndoctrinationen_US
dc.subject.authorAdvertisingen_US
dc.description.recognitionOutstanding Thesisen_US
dc.description.serviceMajor, United States Armyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Scienceen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Science in Defense Analysisen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineDefense Analysisen_US


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