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dc.contributor.advisorAbenheim, Donald
dc.contributor.advisorHalladay, Carolyn
dc.contributor.authorHayes, Emory J.
dc.dateJun-13
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-01T16:51:38Z
dc.date.available2013-08-01T16:51:38Z
dc.date.issued2013-06
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/34674
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution is unlimiteden_US
dc.description.abstractFrom the Peace of Westphalia to the present, the ruling elites of kingdoms and states have attempted one international bargain after another for a variety of purposes. Whether it is to protect the integrity of a ruling system such as aristocratic orders, the prevention of power politics, or the mere hope of avoiding the scourge of world war, the West has consistently sought to use multilateral institutions to accomplish these ends, among others. What causes these multilateral attempts to succeed or fail, and more importantly, what is multilateralisms center of gravity? This thesis suggests that the fear and attractions of state leadersand the circumstance within which they perceive these fears and attractionsis the center of gravity of the Wests most important multilateral attempts. These attempts include the Peace of Westphalia, the British Act of Union, the Congress System, the League of Nations, the United Nations, and the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO). Furthermore, it is these human traits among elite figures in the context of historical study that best explain the success or failure of Western Multilateralism over that of the application of theoretical sciences.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/fearndttractioni1094534674
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. As such, it is in the public domain, and under the provisions of Title 17, United States Code, Section 105, may not be copyrighted.en_US
dc.titleFear and attraction in statecraft: western multilateralism's double-edged swordsen_US
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs
dc.subject.authorMultilateralismen_US
dc.subject.authorEuropeen_US
dc.subject.authorUnited Statesen_US
dc.subject.authorBritainen_US
dc.subject.authorFranceen_US
dc.subject.authorGermanyen_US
dc.subject.authorSoviet Unionen_US
dc.subject.authorThomas Aquinasen_US
dc.subject.authorNiccol Machiavellien_US
dc.subject.authorPeace of Westphaliaen_US
dc.subject.authorThe Concert of Europeen_US
dc.subject.authorThe Congress Systemen_US
dc.subject.authorPower Politicsen_US
dc.subject.authorThe League of Nationsen_US
dc.subject.authorThe United Nationsen_US
dc.subject.authorNATOen_US
dc.subject.authorThe European Unionen_US
dc.description.serviceMajor, United States Armyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Arts In Security Studies (Europe And Eurasia)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineSecurity Studies (Europe And Eurasia)en_US


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