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dc.contributor.advisorMalley, Michael S.
dc.contributor.advisorMabry, Tristan J.
dc.contributor.authorSchein, Jonathan K.
dc.dateJun-13
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-01T16:51:56Z
dc.date.available2013-08-01T16:51:56Z
dc.date.issued2013-06
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/34739
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution is unlimiteden_US
dc.description.abstractRecent reform in Burma has challenged the idea that democratic institutions and the 2008 Burmese Constitution are an empty facade for an authoritarian military government. Burmas minorities, which have been in conflict with the national government since independence in 1948, remain skeptical of recent reforms and continue to call for a return to Panglong, a 1947 agreement to provide autonomy and self-government for ethnic minority regions. Minority groups have consistently demanded federal institutions to protect their rights, and many scholars have advocated an ethnofederal accommodation of Burmas minorities. However, quasi-federal arrangements failed to accommodate ethnic demands during the countrys first democratic period from 194762. To assess the possibility that recent reforms will be more successful, this thesis conducts a comparative study of institutional arrangements to protect minorities in the 1947 and 2008 constitutions. These arrangements are evaluated against the criteria for successful ethnofederal models, such as those offered by Alfred Stepan. Similarities between the initial democratic period and the current one do not inspire optimism, and evaluations using Stepans criteria and variables further discredit the 2008 Constitution as the basis of a federal state. Peace between Burmas ethnicities does not completely rest upon the structures of government, but this thesis concludes that any such peace will not be a result of ethnofederalism based on the current Burmese Constitution.en_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. As such, it is in the public domain, and under the provisions of Title 17, United States Code, Section 105, may not be copyrighted.en_US
dc.titleEthnofederalism and the accommodation of ethnic minorities in Burma: United They Standen_US
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs
dc.subject.authorEthnofederalismen_US
dc.subject.authorFederalismen_US
dc.subject.authorEthnic Conflicten_US
dc.subject.authorEthnicityen_US
dc.subject.authorBurmaen_US
dc.subject.authorMyanmaren_US
dc.subject.authorAlfred Stepanen_US
dc.subject.authorMinorityen_US
dc.subject.authorMinoritiesen_US
dc.subject.authorDemocracyen_US
dc.subject.authorConstitutionen_US
dc.subject.authorBurmanen_US
dc.subject.authorShanen_US
dc.subject.authorKachinen_US
dc.subject.authorArakanen_US
dc.subject.authorChinen_US
dc.subject.authorMonen_US
dc.subject.authorKarenen_US
dc.subject.authorKarennien_US
dc.description.serviceLieutenant Commander, United States Navyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Arts In Security Studies (Far East, Se Asia, The Pacific)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineSecurity Studies (Far East, Se Asia, The Pacific)en_US


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