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dc.contributor.advisorCaldwell, William J.
dc.contributor.advisorRead, Robert R.
dc.contributor.authorTabacchi, Peter J.
dc.date1990-09
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-01T21:15:55Z
dc.date.available2013-08-01T21:15:55Z
dc.date.issued1990-09
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/34943
dc.description.abstractEngineer command and control in a mechanized corps is a complex system. The current doctrine for engineer force structures is inadequate. Three command and control alternative force structures, identified in the Engineer Structure Study, are evaluated to determine which structure best supports a mechanized corps. The analysis is based on the results of a Stochastic, Timed, Attributed Petri Net timed stepped simulation. The model used in this simulation was constructed using an interactive graphical design tool, called Modeler, by a team including the software developer ALPHATECH, the U.S. Army Engineer Center, and the Training and Doctrine Analysis Command. This was the Army's first use of Modeler. The C2 performance of the engineer staffs is simulated for each of the three force structures by simulation message traffic and processing for 15 days of war in three settings, offensive, defensive and transitional from offensive to defensive. The force structures are then analyzed by comparing simulation output using three measures of performances: Processing Capacity, Message-Quality, and Message Processing Speed. The Division Engineer alternative consistently out performs the Base Case and Company Restructure alternatives for each measure of performance and in each of the three settings. Therefore based on these simulations, the Division Engineer alternative is the best force structure to support a mechanized corps.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/analysisofengine1094534943
dc.format.extentvii, 81 p.en_US
dc.languageen_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.subject.lcshMilitary planning.en_US
dc.titleAnalysis of engineer C2 as modeled by stochastic, timed attributed Petri Netsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.secondreaderWhitaker, Lyn R.
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School (U.S.)
dc.contributor.departmentOperations Research (OR)
dc.subject.authorLand Warfareen_US
dc.subject.authorMilitary Planningen_US
dc.subject.authorMilitary Scienceen_US
dc.subject.authorPetri Netsen_US
dc.subject.authorCommand and Controlen_US
dc.subject.authorCombat Engineersen_US
dc.description.serviceCaptain, United States Armyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameM.S. in Operations Researchen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineOperations Researchen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.description.distributionstatementApproved for public release; distribution is unlimited.


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