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dc.contributor.advisorRobinson, G.E.
dc.contributor.authorMidkiff, James R.
dc.dateSeptember 1995
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-13T22:06:54Z
dc.date.available2013-08-13T22:06:54Z
dc.date.issued1995-09
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/35172
dc.description.abstractThis thesis argues that the regime in Saudi Arabia is not prepared to survive a lengthy depression in the oil market. The thesis makes three specific arguments to support this contention. First, I show that Saudi Arabia is a rentier state. That is, unlike most states in the West, the Saudi state relies on external rents for revenues, not internal taxation. Rather than extracting resources from its citizenry, the state merely redistributes resources that come from abroad via the sale of oil. Huge oil revenues permitted the state to allow relations with its own society - relations forged through tribal wars and nascent extraction - to wither. Second, I demonstrate that the on-going depression of the oil market has already weakened the regime, as the growing strength of the Islamist movement indicates. Third, I argue that the oil market will remain weak for years to come, further undermining the Saudi royal family. I conclude by examining the implications for American interests. I argue that, while certain measures should be taken, the United States should not overreact to internal instability in Saudi Arabia. Like in 'revolutionay' Iran, oil will continue to be sold.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/saudiarabiakingd1094535172
dc.format.extent81 p.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. As such, it is in the public domain, and under the provisions of Title 17, United States Code, Section 105, may not be copyrighted.en_US
dc.titleSaudi Arabia: a kingdom in declineen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs (NSA)
dc.description.funderNAen_US
dc.description.recognitionNAen_US
dc.description.serviceU.S. Navy (U.S.N.) authoren_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameM. A. in National Security Affairsen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineNational Security Affairsen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US


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