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dc.contributor.authorBaylouny, Anne Marie
dc.date2008
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-28T23:09:11Z
dc.date.available2013-08-28T23:09:11Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifier.citation"Militarizing Welfare: Neo-liberalism and Jordanian Policy." Middle East Journal 62, no. 2 (2008): 277-303.
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/35584
dc.descriptionMiddle East Journal 62, no. 2 (2008): 277-303. August 2006, International Journal of Middle East Studiesen_US
dc.descriptionhttp://dx.doi.org/DOI: 10.3751.62.2.15.en_US
dc.descriptionThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. As such, it is in the public domain, and under the provisions of Title 17, United States Code, Section 105, it may not be copyrighteden_US
dc.description.abstractJordan’s seemingly successful economic and political reforms have been used to advertise the American vision of societal transformation in the Middle East. The imposition of neo-liberal economic policies removed a key source of welfare for the populace, leaving the regime without a secure base of support. Economic liberalization led to a radical change in the regime’s base of support, marginal- izing the previous regime backers — the East Bank population — and replacing them with a strengthened military, formerly only part of the regime’s support. Initial economic liberalization was a critical juncture when differing outcomes were possible. The 1990s set the institutions and state policies that persisted after these extreme hard times passed. An analytical focus on state social provisioning demonstrates the changed social base of the Jordanian regime and the groups effectively disenfranchised by the new arrangements. The military and security services are the only sector growing in structural adjustment. Alongside decreas- ing social welfare allocations in general, the military’s budgets are increasing and the military diversifying into sub-contracting and new economic enterprises. Militarized liberalization serves as an alternative model for Middle East regimes, one that can furnish the foundation for semi-authoritarianism into the near fu- ture. This changing social base of the regime, illuminated through an examination of social welfare, must be recognized when tackling the perennial question of a democratic deficit in the Middle East.en_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleMilitarizing Welfare: Neo-liberalism and Jordanian Policy.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School
dc.contributor.corporateNational Security Affairs
dc.contributor.corporateCenter on Contemporary Conflict
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of National Security Affairs


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