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dc.contributor.authorAbbott, Benjamin
dc.contributor.authorKaiser, Chad
dc.contributor.authorMilliken, Mike
dc.contributor.authorAtamian, Michael
dc.dateApril 2008
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-28T23:11:04Z
dc.date.available2013-08-28T23:11:04Z
dc.date.issued2008-04
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/35636
dc.descriptionfrom Scythe : Proceedings and Bulletin of the International Data Farming Community, Issue 4 Workshop 16en_US
dc.description.abstractThe threat facing the U.S. Navy is changing from engagement in blue water to combat in the littorals. In order to meet this threat, the U.S. Navy built the Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) — a high speed, shallow draft, focused-mission platform capable of operating independently, as a squadron, or as part of a Carrier/Expeditionary Strike Group (CSG/ ESG).1 As with every new platform, many questions regarding the employment of LCS are still unanswered. How many LCS should comprise a squadron?en_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleTeam 2: Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) Mission Packages: Determining the Best Mixen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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