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dc.contributor.advisorMichael, Sherif
dc.contributor.advisorBiblarz, Oscar
dc.contributor.authorLuce, Richard C., Jr.
dc.dateDecember 2002
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-14T17:38:51Z
dc.date.available2012-03-14T17:38:51Z
dc.date.issued2002-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/3605
dc.descriptionApproved for public release, distribution is unlimiteden_US
dc.description.abstractSatellite lifetime is often limited by degradation of the electrical power subsystem--radiation-damaged solar arrays and failed batteries. Being able to beam power from terrestrial sites could alleviate this limitation, extending the lifetime of billions of dollars of satellite assets, as well as providing additional energy for electric propulsion that can be used for stationkeeping and orbital changes. In addition, laboratory research at the Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) has shown the potential to anneal damaged solar cells using lasers. This thesis decribes that research, preliminary work performed lasing a representative solar panel array, and a proposed Maui experiment to demonstrate the relevant concepts by lasing PANSAT, an NPS-built and operated spacecraft. The preliminary work done at Maui involved lasing a PANSAT silicon photovoltaic array using a 975 nm Yb:YAG source at output power levels of 7 W, 14 W and 21 W. These results matched those obtained under near-AM0 conditions atop Mount Haleakala (for the 7 W case) and extrapolated to match predicted output levels. Enough data points were collected at each power level to generate an I-V curve for the panel, identifying the open circuit voltage, short circuit current, and maximum power points. The efficiency of the panel varied from 13.1% (as expected for monochromatic light) at 7 W to 11.3% at 21 W due to uniform heating of the cells. These results represent a "ground truth" baseline from which further research can continue.en_US
dc.format.extentxiv, 79 p. : col. ill.en_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. As such, it is in the public domain, and under the provisions of Title 17, United States Code, Section 105, may not be copyrighted.en_US
dc.subject.lcshSpace vehiclesen_US
dc.subject.lcshAuxiliary power supplyen_US
dc.subject.lcshSolar cellsen_US
dc.titleSpacecraft power beaming and solar cell annealing using high-energy lasersen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School (U.S.)
dc.contributor.departmentAeronautics and Astronautics
dc.subject.authorLaseren_US
dc.subject.authorSolar cellen_US
dc.subject.authorPhotovoltaicsen_US
dc.subject.authorPower beamingen_US
dc.subject.authorAnnealingen_US
dc.subject.authorWireless power transmissionen_US
dc.subject.authorElectric propulsionen_US
dc.subject.authorPANSATen_US
dc.description.serviceCaptain, United States Air Forceen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameM.S. in Astronautical Engineeringen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineAstronautical Engineeringen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
etd.verifiednoen_US


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