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dc.contributor.authorChu, Peter C.
dc.date2009
dc.date.accessioned2013-09-11T23:02:53Z
dc.date.available2013-09-11T23:02:53Z
dc.date.issued2009
dc.identifier.citationChu, P. C., 2009: Mine impact burial prediction from one to three dimensions. Applied Mechanics Reviews, American Society of Mechanical Engineers, 62, 010802 (paper download).
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/36122
dc.descriptionApplied Mechanics Reviews, American Society of Mechanical Engineers, 62, 010802en_US
dc.descriptionThe article of record as published may be located at http://dx.doi.org/10.1115/1.3013823en_US
dc.description.abstractThe Navy’s mine impact burial prediction model creates a time history of a cylindrical or a noncylindrical mine as it falls through air, water, and sediment. The output of the model is the predicted mine trajectory in air and water columns, burial depth/orientation in sediment, as well as height, area, and volume protruding. Model inputs consist of parameters of environment, mine characteristics, and initial release. This paper reviews near three decades’ effort on model development from one to three dimensions: (1) onedimensional models predict the vertical position of the mine’s center of mass (COM) with the assumption of constant falling angle, (2) two-dimensional models predict the COM position in the x,z plane and the rotation around the y-axis, and (3) three-dimensional models predict the COM position in the x,y,z space and the rotation around the x-, y-, and z-axes. These models are verified using the data collected from mine impact burial experiments. The one-dimensional model only solves one momentum equation (in the z-direction). It cannot predict the mine trajectory and burial depth well. The twodimensional model restricts the mine motion in the x,z plane (which requires motionless for the environmental fluids) and uses incorrect drag coefficients and inaccurate sediment dynamics. The prediction errors are large in the mine trajectory and burial depth prediction (six to ten times larger than the observed depth in sand bottom of the Monterey Bay). The three-dimensional model predicts the trajectory and burial depth relatively well for cylindrical, near-cylindrical mines, and operational mines such as Manta and Rockan mines.en_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. As such, it is in the public domain, and under the provisions of Title 17, United States Code, Section 105, may not be copyrighted.en_US
dc.titleMine impact burial prediction from one to three dimensionsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentOceanographyen_US
dc.subject.authormine impact burial prediction, Kirchhoff–Kelvin equation, IBPM, IMPACT25/28, IMPACT35, drag and lift forces and torques, translation velocity, orientation, burial depth, sediment dynamics, triple coordinate system, mine shape effect, cylindrical mine, Manta mine, Rockan mineen_US


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