Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorRowe, Neil C.
dc.date2005
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-08T18:43:44Z
dc.date.available2013-10-08T18:43:44Z
dc.date.issued2005
dc.identifier.citationThis article appeared in the Encyclopedia of Virtual Communities and Technologies, Hershey, PA: Idea Group, 2005.
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/36833
dc.descriptionEncyclopedia of Virtual Communities and Technologies, Hershey, PA: Idea Group, 2005.en_US
dc.description.abstractDeception in virtual communities can be a serious issue. We present three approaches to characterizing online deception: by the appearance, by the motivation, and by the mechanism. Appearances include identity deception, mimicking, lying (by insincere statements, false excuses, or false promises), and fraud. Motivations can be both aggressive and defensive. Mechanisms are analyzed using concepts from case grammar in linguistics. Fundamentally new forms of deception not in these taxonomies are unlikely in virtual communities.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipsupported by the National Science Foundation under the Cyber Trust programen_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.titleTypes of Online Deceptionen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentComputer Science (CS)
dc.subject.authorcase grammaren_US
dc.subject.authordeceptionen_US
dc.subject.authordisinformationen_US
dc.subject.authorexcusesen_US
dc.subject.authoridentity deceptionen_US
dc.subject.authorliesen_US
dc.subject.authorshillingen_US
dc.subject.authorsocial engineeringen_US
dc.subject.authortrollingen_US
dc.description.distributionstatementApproved for public release; distribution is unlimited.


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record