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dc.contributor.advisorBrown, R. Mitchell
dc.contributor.advisorTeti, Frank M.
dc.contributor.authorKlepper, Tommy David
dc.date.accessioned2013-11-20T23:33:30Z
dc.date.available2013-11-20T23:33:30Z
dc.date.issued1990-06
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/37525
dc.description.abstractAs the United States enters the decade of the 1990s, it is essential to review the guidance and policies for our force structures. At the focal point of discussion on future force structures for the United States is the strategic nuclear forces. The strategic nuclear force structure for the United States has been predicated on the concept of a Triad, which consists of three legs, referred to as land-based, sea-based, and manned bombers. Each of the legs consists of separate components. Understanding the tradition of the United States strategic deterrent being predicated on the Triad concept, it is concluded that with the changing international environment and the declaratory statements for continuing to decrease the Defense Budget, a new and realistic review of the factors for determining a strategic nuclear force should be researched. Therefore, the intention of this thesis is to review and analyze the five factors which may contribute to the formulation of a realistic policy for the 1990s with regard to the United States strategic nuclear forces. The final results of the research have indicated sufficient evidence that a policy review of the strategic nuclear Triad should be conducted to meet the challenges and realities of the 1990s and the 21st Century.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/triadordyadforsb1094537525
dc.format.extentv, 138 p.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.subject.lcshStrategic forces--(United States)en_US
dc.subject.lcshDeterrence (Strategy)en_US
dc.subject.lcshNuclear Weapons--United Statesen_US
dc.subject.lcshUnited States--Armed Forces--Weapons systemsen_US
dc.subject.lcshUnited States--Military protocolen_US
dc.titleTriad or dyad for the 1990's : a balance of realityen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School (U.S.)
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs (NSA)
dc.subject.authortriaden_US
dc.subject.authordyaden_US
dc.subject.authornational security strategyen_US
dc.subject.authorstrategic threaten_US
dc.subject.authorarms control and the START Treatyen_US
dc.subject.authorstrategic weapons modernization programen_US
dc.subject.authorcongressional influenceen_US
dc.description.serviceLieutenant Commander, United States Navyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameM.A. in National Security Affairsen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineNational Security Affairsen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.description.distributionstatementApproved for public release; distribution is unlimited.


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