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dc.contributor.advisorLewis, Theodore G.
dc.contributor.authorMcQuinn, Matthew E.
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-14T17:39:17Z
dc.date.available2012-03-14T17:39:17Z
dc.date.issued2008-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/3753
dc.description.abstractU.S. critical infrastructure includes those assets that are vital to maintaining the nation's security, economy, and public health and safety. A reliable supply of electric power provides an essential foundation for the daily operation of all national critical infrastructure as well as most aspects of modern society. A sustained loss of electricity would be significantly detrimental to the economy and the health and security of the nation. Since 1935, the U.S. electric power industry has been heavily regulated in order to address issues such as consumer protection, rate control, conservation, and market competition. However, legislators have not considered the impact of regulations on the resiliency of critical infrastructure. This thesis argues that the energy sector regulatory framework has directly resulted in decreased security and reliability of electric power infrastructure. Energy legislation has created a "tragedy of the commons" situation for power transmission lines where utilities are reluctant to invest in infrastructure needed to ensure the reliable delivery of electricity. The solution to ensuring the resilience of electric power infrastructure is to craft a combination of regulatory improvements, reliability standards, and financial incentives to ensure the electric power industry is able to provide the foundational structure needed for U.S. national security.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/energyregulation109453753
dc.format.extentxvi, 77 p. ;en_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined
in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. As such, it is in the
public domain, and under the provisions of Title 17, United States
Code, Section 105, is not copyrighted in the U.S.en_US
dc.subject.lcshElectricityen_US
dc.subject.lcshNational securityen_US
dc.subject.lcshUnited Statesen_US
dc.titleEnergy regulation effects on critical infrastructure protectionen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.secondreaderStockton, Paul N.
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs
dc.description.recognitionOutstanding Thesisen_US
dc.description.serviceUS Air Force (USAF) author.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc301713741
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Arts in Security Studiesen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineSecurity Studiesen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
etd.verifiednoen_US
dc.description.distributionstatementApproved for public release; distribution is unlimited.


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