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dc.contributor.advisorPetross, Diana
dc.contributor.advisorNaegle, Brad
dc.contributor.authorDodge, Meghan N.
dc.contributor.authorMcKelvey, Robert F., III
dc.dateSep-13
dc.date.accessioned2013-11-20T23:36:02Z
dc.date.available2013-11-20T23:36:02Z
dc.date.issued2013-09
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/37614
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution is unlimiteden_US
dc.description.abstractReliability, Availability, and Maintainability (RAM) and Survivability are both diverse disciplines that explore how a system will perform when placed within an operational environment. This Joint Applied Project provides a qualitative analysis of the interconnectivity of RAM and Survivability. It shows that an in-depth RAM analysis ensures military personnel are better protected throughout the life cycle. Methodologies for improving reliability and maintainability are also presented, to include physics of failure, highly accelerated life testing/highly accelerated stress screening, preventative maintenance determination and pit stop engineering. This analysis uses an Active Protection System (APS) to show that, when RAM is included in the Survivability Onion; both Survivability and RAM evaluations benefit; survivability assessments become more complete; RAM assessments are completed sooner; and ultimately, better systems are put into the hands of service members. As APS requirements are developed, it is important that they include the Materiel Availability Key Performance Parameter with associated Reliability and Ownership Cost Key System Attributes. When evaluating an APS (or any system) the independent evaluator team members need to integrate and discuss the impacts of the capabilities and limitations they observed with each other to ensure that the deficiencies are properly addressed in the reports.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/whysurvivability1094537614
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. As such, it is in the public domain, and under the provisions of Title 17, United States Code, Section 105, may not be copyrighted.en_US
dc.titleWhy the survivability onion should include Reliability, Availability, and Maintainability (RAM)en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentBusiness & Public Policy (GSBPP)
dc.subject.authorReliabilityen_US
dc.subject.authorAvailabilityen_US
dc.subject.authorMaintainability (RAM)en_US
dc.subject.authorSurvivabilityen_US
dc.subject.authorTest and Evaluationen_US
dc.subject.authorActive Protection Systemsen_US
dc.description.serviceCivilian, Department of the Armyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster Of Science In Program Managementen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineProgram Managementen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US


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