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dc.contributor.advisorBaylouny, Anne Marie
dc.contributor.authorKuhlow, Sasha J.
dc.dateSep-13
dc.date.accessioned2013-11-20T23:36:13Z
dc.date.available2013-11-20T23:36:13Z
dc.date.issued2013-09
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/37655
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution is unlimiteden_US
dc.description.abstractThe Arab Spring protests in 2011 uprooted regimes, challenged authoritarian leaders, and provided protesters new tools for mobilization. The use of social media and the involvement of women in public protests indicated changing protest repertoires and movement demographics in many countries. When women protested in 2011, they mobilized both physically and virtually. Assessing the influence women exert in social movements through social media can provide insights into factors that make a social movement successful. This thesis asserts that women physically mobilized to participate in the Arab Spring protests in Egypt, Yemen, and Bahrain. In Egypt and Bahrain, women also mobilized virtually using social media, while in Yemen women participated through traditional forms of social mobilization. An assessment of Twitter data in Egypt and Bahrain indicates that women communicated out to others more than their male counterparts, while men received more information from others. Data also indicates that women followed significantly more sources of information than men, thus contributing to the diversity of online protest networks. Notably, women represented nearly fifty percent of the most connected users in the Egyptian Twitter data, communicating to nearly twice as many users and following four times as many information sources, as their male counterparts.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/thedifferentiali1094537655
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. As such, it is in the public domain, and under the provisions of Title 17, United States Code, Section 105, may not be copyrighted.en_US
dc.titleThe differential impact of women's pariticipation in the Arab Springen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.secondreaderMabry, Tristan J.
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs
dc.subject.authorEgypten_US
dc.subject.authorBahrainen_US
dc.subject.authorYemenen_US
dc.subject.authorArab Springen_US
dc.subject.authorsocial mediaen_US
dc.subject.authorTwitteren_US
dc.subject.authorsocial movementsen_US
dc.subject.authorsocial networkingen_US
dc.subject.authorprotesten_US
dc.subject.authorrevolutionen_US
dc.subject.authorgender participationen_US
dc.subject.authornon-violent protest.en_US
dc.description.serviceMajor, United States Marine Corpsen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster Of Arts In Security Studies (Middle East, South Asia, And Sub-Saharan Africa)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineSecurity Studies (Middle East, South Asia, And Sub-saharan Africa)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US


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