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dc.contributor.advisorGreen, John M.
dc.contributor.advisorShebalin, Paul
dc.contributor.authorBradley, Cayle
dc.contributor.authorLy, Darren
dc.contributor.authorGamban, Dennis
dc.contributor.authorMoreno, Hermanzo
dc.contributor.authorPodawiltz, Matthew
dc.contributor.authorWilk, Adam
dc.dateSep-13
dc.date.accessioned2013-11-20T23:36:28Z
dc.date.available2013-11-20T23:36:28Z
dc.date.issued2013-09
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/37707
dc.descriptionSYSTEMS ENGINEERING CAPSTONE PROJECT REPORTen_US
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution is unlimiteden_US
dc.description.abstractIn the aftermath of the Cold War, proliferation of late-20th-century Soviet and NATO offensive weaponry has provided many countries and groups around the globe with the ability to challenge the defensive infrastructure of neighboring states. With the collapse of the Soviet Union, the struggle between two great superpowers to gain and maintain access to regions of strategic interest has been eclipsed by the emergence of new threatscorrupt regimes, warlords, and terrorists who now have the capability to attack civilian populations, destabilize regional governments, and threaten United States and allied strategic interests. Of particular concern are the threats presented by aggressor short- and medium-range ballistic missiles. These weapons, capable of carrying weaponized chemical or biological payloads, are small, mobile, and difficult to track. Aegis, the premiere sea-based ballistic missile defense (BMD) system of the U.S. Navy, is a high-demand, cost-limited resource that cannot be mobilized to defend all potential target zones. A smaller, more mobile solution is necessary to afford foreign U.S. interests adequate protection. This paper details a systems engineering approach to assess the emergent ballistic missile threat, synthesize solution options to meet littoral region capability needs, and conduct comparative analyses to downselect a conceptual BMD system that meets stakeholder needs.en_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United Statesen_US
dc.titleMissile defense in the 21st century acquisition environment: exploring a BMD-capable LCS mission packageen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School (U.S.)
dc.contributor.departmentSystems Engineering (SE)
dc.subject.authorBallistic Missile Defenseen_US
dc.subject.authorLittoral Combat Shipen_US
dc.subject.authorSystems Engineeringen_US
dc.subject.authorRaid Annihilationen_US
dc.subject.authorProbability of Killen_US
dc.subject.authorRadaren_US
dc.subject.authorFire Control.en_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster Of Science In Systems Engineeringen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineSystems Engineeringen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US


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