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dc.contributor.advisorPeterson, Zachary
dc.contributor.advisorGondree, Mark
dc.contributor.authorZepf, Arthur L.,IV
dc.dateSep-13
dc.date.accessioned2013-11-20T23:36:38Z
dc.date.available2013-11-20T23:36:38Z
dc.date.issued2013-09
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/37750
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution is unlimiteden_US
dc.description.abstractThere have been only a small number of attempts at creating a cyber-security curriculum that can be used to teach children the concepts of cyber security and information assurance. There is a significant shortage of attempts at creating a computer-security curricula and cyber-security training for people who have only basic computer skills. Also, the integration of computer-security and information assurance principles into formal and accepted primary and secondary education is nearly non-existent. Our research has been aimed at evaluating the current computer-security curricula according to widely accepted educational standards. The objective is to (i) create a set of requirements to analyze the effectiveness of computer-security curricula, (ii) determine the best current disseminated cyber-security curriculum for children, (iii) and make recommendations for a cyber-security curriculum by utilizing the best traits of the surveyed programs. Literature includes studies on previously created computer-security curricula; and the most effective means of teaching children new concepts. Our research questions include: Is it important for a curriculum to be flexible enough to affect a variety of age groups? Is it important for a computer-security education to be interactive and motivational? Is it possible to teach difficult computer-security concepts in a way that children can understand?en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/cybersecuritycur1094537750
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. As such, it is in the public domain, and under the provisions of Title 17, United States Code, Section 105, may not be copyrighted.en_US
dc.titleCyber-security curricula for basic usersen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentComputer Sciences
dc.subject.authorComputer-securityen_US
dc.subject.authorcyber-securityen_US
dc.subject.authoreducationen_US
dc.subject.authorcurriculumen_US
dc.subject.authornon-technical computer usersen_US
dc.subject.authorInternet safety.en_US
dc.description.serviceLieutenant, United States Navyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster Of Science In Computer Scienceen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineComputer Scienceen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US


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