Publication:
Proceedings of the Third Annual Acquisition Research Symposium. Acquisition Research: Creating Synergy for Informed Change May 17-18, 2006

Authors
Subject Authors
Avisors
Date of Issue
2006-04-30
Date
2006-04-30
Publisher
Monterey, California. Naval Postgraduate School
Language
Abstract
Those familiar with the Naval Postgraduate School's Acquisition Research Program know that, since its inception in 2003, we have promoted the idea of big A Acquisition as a core theme. This term is intended to highlight Acquisition's inherent complexity as an endeavor that entails a variety of challenges, including political, managerial, technological and--in the case of defense Acquisition--military challenges. It also highlights the need for research from a variety of disciplines to be brought to bear in order to meet these challenges. The NPS Acquisition Research Program's purposeful pursuit of big A Acquisition research is evident in these Proceedings. Disciplines and fields of study which are represented include contract management, project management, logistics and supply chain management, systems engineering, economics, public management and policy, financial management, information systems, and organizational behavior. While research in a few other disciplines (e.g., personnel management) has yet to be tapped, the engagement of such a wide range of approaches represents, in our view, significant progress. The past year marked the coming of age of the Acquisition Research Program. By every measure, the program grew and matured. The number of projects and products more than doubled over 2004 and faculty participation was up 50%. Of special significance was the increased involvement of tenured track faculty, from eight to twenty-one, in acquisition research. Much of this progress can be attributed to the increased stability of the program. Funds were readily identifiable and available to allow faculty to count on them when formulating their work plans for the coming year. A formalized research proposal and solicitation process was established by the Associate Dean of Research in the Graduate School of Business and Public Policy (GSBPP) which greatly enhanced communication about the program and encouraged participation. It was apparent that interest in the program had spread throughout the faculty, and future program growth would be constrained only by financial resources. Similar remarks could be made about student involvement and participation. The program has also made a major contribution to maintaining the relevancy of faculty and instructional materials. Significant benefits to researchers include: (1) provision of funding which saves researchers marketing time; (2) ties with sponsor POCs, thus assuring DoD-relevant research; (3) assistance with final formatting, editing and publishing, thus relieving researchers from the non-intellectual aspects of their research. Each of these is a substantial benefit, but the growing connectivity between researchers and sponsors is paying large dividends to all concerned. New, relevant instructional materials emerge out of almost all research products, and this has a positive impact on all students. Sponsors receive substantial help and insight with the business issues of the day. Faculty are refreshed in DoD-relevant subject matter, and students are better prepared to enter the acquisition work force.
Type
Technical Report
Description
Third Annual Acquisition Research Symposium
Department
Identifiers
NPS Report Number
NPS-AM-06-011
Sponsors
Funder
Format
ix, 473 p.: ill.
Citation
Distribution Statement
Rights
This publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.