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dc.contributor.advisorMcCaffery, Jerry L.
dc.contributor.advisorHoivik, Thomas H.
dc.contributor.authorMoore, Kevin L.
dc.contributor.authorHo, Chih-Haur
dc.contributor.authorFoust, Coleen
dc.contributor.authorKerutis, Aidas
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-19T18:38:19Z
dc.date.available2013-12-19T18:38:19Z
dc.date.issued2007-06
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/38044
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution is unlimited.en_US
dc.descriptionMBA Professional Reporten_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this MBA Project is to investigate and provide an analysis of the prominent factors that affecr the United States Foreign Military Sales (FMS) program. This project was conducted with the sponsorship and assistance of the Naval Postgraduate School's Acquisition Research Institute, Financial Management and International programs. The overall goal of this project is three-fold: 1) to identify the purpose of the United States FMS program and its processes 2) to identify, define and evaluate historical economic, political, social and industrial changes and trends that affect FMS worldwide allocation and support and 3) to apply these findings to a specific country (Taiwan) to make a prediction of future participation and support. The role of arms sales in world politics has grown tremendously since the end of World War II and more specifically since the passage of new arms laws in 1979. The importance of FMS is increasingly evident in the foreign policies of both supplier and recipient nations, in international politics, competition and relations. Arms sales have become in recent years a crucial dimension of international affairs. This paper examines several trends in military equipment, services and training exchanges and investigates their potential impact on the future conflicts. The nature of FMS is complex. This research plans to identify and analyze trends relating to socio-political, economic, and industrial and technological changes associated with FMS spending. This discussion then applies these findings to Taiwan as a case study and expands on the customer's experience with FMS. The intent of this paper is to increase the reader's knowledge of FMS, pinpoint trends in the program and use FMS to Taiwan as a point of comparison to increase comprehension of this extremely complex and not well-understood program.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/foreignmilitarys1094538044
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California, Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. As such, it is in the public domain, and under the provisions of Title 17, United States Code, Section 105, may not be copyrighted.en_US
dc.subjectForeign Military Salesen_US
dc.subjectTaiwanen_US
dc.subjectFMS Trendsen_US
dc.titleForeign Military Sales trend analysis: impacts on the future with application to Taiwanen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentGraduate School of Business & Public Policy (GSBPP)
dc.description.serviceUS Army (USA) authoren_US
dc.description.serviceRepublic of China authoren_US
dc.description.serviceUS Air Force (USAF) authoren_US
dc.description.serviceLithuanian Air Force authoren_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Business Administrationen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineBusiness Administrationen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US


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