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dc.contributor.authorBrook, Douglas A.
dc.contributor.authorCandreva, Philip J.
dc.dateFall 2007
dc.date.accessioned2014-01-09T22:19:49Z
dc.date.available2014-01-09T22:19:49Z
dc.date.issued2007
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/38080
dc.descriptionPublic Budgeting & Finance / Fall 2007en_US
dc.descriptionCenter for Defense Management Research (CDMR)en_US
dc.description.abstractBusiness management reform efforts have been part of the U.S. Defense Department agenda for decades. Current reform efforts have explicitly established the goal of generating, harvesting, and reinvesting savings from business management reform to buy more capital items; that is, they have focused on a measurable reallocation from operating and support costs to investment within a given budget top line. Recent increases in the defense top line, largely related to the war on terrorism, are not likely to persist; in addition, an examination of the factors affecting the top line suggests that a decline in the near term is likely. An examination of current and past defense management reforms suggests that efficiency-seeking business management reforms are not likely to generate sufficient resources to cover a budget decline. Instead, management reform should be sustained for reasons of stewardship and accountability.en_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleBusiness Management Reform in the Department of Defense in Anticipation of Declining Budgetsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentGraduate School of Business & Public Policy (GSBPP)
dc.subject.authorFinancial Management Reformen_US


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