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dc.contributor.advisorPiombo, Jessica
dc.contributor.advisorMiller, Alice L.
dc.contributor.authorBetz, Jeffrey D.
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-14T17:39:30Z
dc.date.available2012-03-14T17:39:30Z
dc.date.issued2008-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/3818
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution is unlimiteden_US
dc.description.abstractSince its creation in 1949, the People's Republic of China has had to deal with problems of ethnic conflict. This is due to China's large and diverse minority population, which accounts for approximately eight percent of the total population, or nearly 100 million people. From 1949 onward, the PRC has struggled to integrate these diverse people into a unified nation. Throughout this period the relationship between the Chinese government and many of the country's minorities has been fraught with conflict. This thesis examines the role of the institutions used by Beijing to manage its relationship with minorities in China. It includes a discussion of current theoretical research on ethnic conflict, a detailed explanation of the institutional approach to the study of ethnic conflict, and the application of this institutional approach to the Chinese case. In applying the institutional framework to the PRC's experience, this thesis examines the different ethnic conflict management strategies employed by Beijing from 1949 to present and evaluates the response of China's minorities to each strategy. Ultimately, this thesis concludes that the institutions used by the Chinese government since 1949 have not been effective at mitigating ethnic conflict in China. Additionally, this study demonstrates that the institutional approach is highly useful in understanding the causes of ethnic conflict in the Chinese case.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/aninstitutionals109453818
dc.format.extentviii, 91 p. ;en_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.subject.lcshMinoritiesen_US
dc.subject.lcshChinaen_US
dc.subject.lcshZhuang (Chinese people)en_US
dc.subject.lcshEthnic relationsen_US
dc.titleAn institutional assessment of ethnic conflict in Chinaen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School (U.S.)
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs
dc.description.recognitionOutstanding Thesisen_US
dc.description.serviceUS Navy (USN) author.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc301358390
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster of Arts in Security Studiesen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineSecurity Studiesen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
etd.verifiednoen_US


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