A training framework for the Department of Defense public key infrastructure

Loading...
Thumbnail Image
Authors
Ziemba, Marcia L.
Subjects
Advisors
Warren, Daniel F.
Irvine, Cynthia E.
Date of Issue
1999-03
Date
Publisher
Monterey, California. Naval Postgraduate School
Language
Abstract
Increased use of the Internet and the growth of electronic commerce within the Department of Defense (DoD) has led to the development and implementation of the DoD Public Key Infrastructure (PKI). Any PKI can only serve its intended purpose if there is trust within the system. This thesis reviews the basics of public (or asymmetric) key cryptography and its counterpart, symmetric key cryptography. It outlines the DoDαs PKI implementation plan and the user roles identified within the infrastructure. Because a PKI relies entirely on trust, training for all users of a PKI is essential. The current approach to PKI training within the DoD will not provide all of its users with the required level of understanding of the system as a whole, or of the implications and ramifications that their individual actions may have upon the system. The decentralized, segmented, and inconsistent approach to PKI training will result in a lack of trust within the PKI. Training for the DoD PKI must be consistent, current, appropriate, and available to all users at any time. The author proposes a web-based training framework for the DoD PKI. The basic requirements and design of the framework are presented, and a prototype is developed for further testing and evaluation. Without the proper attention to training, the DoD PKI will be at risk, and may not perform its intended functions of providing the required authenticity and integrity across the various networks upon which DoD conducts business.
Type
Thesis
Description
Series/Report No
Department
Information Technology Management
Organization
Identifiers
NPS Report Number
Sponsors
Funder
Format
xvi, 97 p. ;
Citation
Distribution Statement
Rights
This publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.
Collections