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dc.contributor.authorMoltz, James Clay
dc.dateFall 2009
dc.date.accessioned2014-01-15T18:33:22Z
dc.date.available2014-01-15T18:33:22Z
dc.date.issued2009
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/38368
dc.description.abstractThe question of how the moon will be governed once humans return in about a decade and begin to establish permanent bases matters greatly to the future of international security. Already, a range of major powers have plans to participate in the moon’s further scientific exploration, commercial exploitation, and possible permanent settlement. If we count both manned and robotic activities, this list currently includes the United States, China, Russia, India, Germany, the United Kingdom, the European Space Agency, Japan, and South Korea. Other countries are likely to join this list in the coming years.en_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleToward Cooperation or Conflict on the Moon? Considering Lunar Governance in Historical Perspectiveen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs


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