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dc.contributor.authorThomas, Gail Fann
dc.contributor.authorKing, Cynthia L.
dc.contributor.authorBaroni, Brian
dc.contributor.authorCook, Linda
dc.contributor.authorKeitelman, Marian
dc.contributor.authorMiller, Steve
dc.contributor.authorWardle, Adelia
dc.date.accessioned2014-01-28T19:51:24Z
dc.date.available2014-01-28T19:51:24Z
dc.date.issued2006
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/38478
dc.descriptionThe article of record as published may be located at http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1050651906287253en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study explores social processes associated with e-mail overload, drawing on Sproull and Kiesler's first- and second-order effects of communication technologies and Boden's theory of lamination. In a three-part study, the authors examined e-mail interactions from a government organization by logging e-mails, submitting an e-mail string to close textual analysis, and analyzing focus group data about e-mail overload. The requests reveal three characteristics that contribute to e-mail overload- unstable requests, pressures to respond, and the delegation of tasks and shifting interactants - suggesting the e-mail talk, as social interaction, may both create and affect overload.en_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. As such, it is in the public domain, and under the provisions of Title 17, United States Code, Section 105, may not be copyrighted.en_US
dc.titleReconceptualizing E-mail Overloaden_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.subject.authore-mailen_US
dc.subject.authore-mail overloaden_US
dc.subject.authorinformation overloaden_US
dc.subject.authortechnologyen_US
dc.subject.authordiscourse analysisen_US


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