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dc.contributor.authorThomas, Gail Fann
dc.contributor.authorKing, Cynthia L.
dc.contributor.authorBaroni, Brian
dc.contributor.authorCook, Linda
dc.contributor.authorKeitelman, Marian
dc.contributor.authorMiller, Steve
dc.contributor.authorWardle, Adelia
dc.date.accessioned2014-01-28T19:51:24Z
dc.date.available2014-01-28T19:51:24Z
dc.date.issued2006
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/38478
dc.descriptionThe article of record as published may be located at http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1050651906287253en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study explores social processes associated with e-mail overload, drawing on Sproull and Kiesler's first- and second-order effects of communication technologies and Boden's theory of lamination. In a three-part study, the authors examined e-mail interactions from a government organization by logging e-mails, submitting an e-mail string to close textual analysis, and analyzing focus group data about e-mail overload. The requests reveal three characteristics that contribute to e-mail overload- unstable requests, pressures to respond, and the delegation of tasks and shifting interactants - suggesting the e-mail talk, as social interaction, may both create and affect overload.en_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleReconceptualizing E-mail Overloaden_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.subject.authore-mailen_US
dc.subject.authore-mail overloaden_US
dc.subject.authorinformation overloaden_US
dc.subject.authortechnologyen_US
dc.subject.authordiscourse analysisen_US


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