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dc.contributor.authorEkaterinaris, John A.
dc.contributor.authorPlatzer, Max F.
dc.date.accessioned2014-01-29T22:10:02Z
dc.date.available2014-01-29T22:10:02Z
dc.date.issued1997
dc.identifier.citationProgress in Aerospace Science, v.33, 1997, pp. 759-846.
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/38498
dc.description.abstractThe term dynamic stall refers to unsteady flow separation occurring on aerodynamic bodies, such as airfoils and wings, which execute an unsteady motion. The prediction of dynamic stall is important for flight vehicle, turbomachinery, and wind turbine applications. Due to the complicated flow physics of the dynamic stall phenomenon the industry has been forced to use empirical methods for its prediction. However, recent progress in computational methods and the tremendous increase in computing power has made possible the use of the full fluid dynamic governing equations for dynamic stall investigation and prediction in the design process. It is the objective of this review to present the major approaches and results obtained in recent years and to point out existing deficiencies and possibilities for improvements. To this end, potential flow, boundary layer, viscous-inviscid interaction, and Navier-Stokes methods are described. The most commonly used numerical schemes for their solution are briefly described. Turbulence models used for the computation of high Reynolds number turbulent flows, which are of primary interest to industry, are presented. The impact of transition from laminar to turbulent flow on the dynamic stall phenonmenon is discussed and currently available methods for it prediction are summarized. The main computational results obtained for airfoil and wing dynamic stall and comparisons with available experimental measurements are present. The review concludes with a discussion of existing deficiencies and possiblities for future improvements.en_US
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleComputational prediction of airfoil dynamic stallen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School
dc.contributor.departmentAeronautics and Astronautics


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