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dc.contributor.advisorZyda, Michael J.
dc.contributor.advisorPratt, David R
dc.contributor.authorNash, David Allan
dc.date1992-Sep
dc.date.accessioned2014-01-29T23:38:04Z
dc.date.available2014-01-29T23:38:04Z
dc.date.issued1992-09
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/38574
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution unlimited.en_US
dc.description.abstractGraphical computer simulations provide a means through which weapon prototyping and tactical evaluations can be conducted at low cost, without the risks associated with the movement of equipment and firing of weapons. Because of the widespread use of ballistic munitions in the armed forces, a fundamental aspect of the implementation of such military simulations is a physical model that governs ballistic behavior. The modified point-mass trajectory model is used to implement ballistic trajectories within NPSNET, a real-time, graphical, three-dimensional simulation. A parallel algorithm is used to simulate the visual characteristics of shrapnel-producing explosions. A special case of ballistic trajectories involves the application of indirect fires. When a projectile travels along a curved path to the target area, rather than being propelled directly along the line of sight, much greater ranges can be achieved. This makes it possible to fire upon an enemy without directly exposing the firing elements to harm. As a result of these increased ranges, it is generally not possible for the firing element to acquire its own targets. Thus, an additional player is required to represent this tactic in a virtual world: the forward observer. An expert system is presented that mimics the cognitive contributions of a human forward observer.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/npsnetmodelingin1094538574
dc.format.extent54 p. ; 28 cm.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. As such, it is in the public domain, and under the provisions of Title 17, United States Code, Section 105, may not be copyrighted.en_US
dc.titleNPSNET: modeling the in-flight and terminal properties of ballistic munitionsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School
dc.subject.authorArtificial Intelligenceen_US
dc.subject.authorArtificial realityen_US
dc.subject.authorArtilleryen_US
dc.subject.authorAutonomous agentsen_US
dc.subject.authorBallisticsen_US
dc.subject.authorComputer graphicsen_US
dc.subject.authorGraphicsen_US
dc.subject.authorModelingen_US
dc.subject.authorObject orienteden_US
dc.subject.authorParticle systemsen_US
dc.subject.authorReal timeen_US
dc.subject.authorSimulationen_US
dc.subject.authorTrajectoryen_US
dc.subject.authorVirtual realityen_US
dc.subject.authorVirtual worlden_US
dc.description.serviceCaptain, United States Armyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameM.S. in Computer Scienceen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineComputer Scienceen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US


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