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dc.contributor.authorJones, Patricia M.
dc.contributor.authorGraves, Gaye L.
dc.contributor.authorAllard, Terry
dc.contributor.authorBlackhurst, Jack
dc.contributor.authorFitts, David J.
dc.contributor.authorPeters, Sean
dc.contributor.authorPiccione, Dino
dc.contributor.authorShattuck, Lawrence G.
dc.date.accessioned2014-02-06T17:19:56Z
dc.date.available2014-02-06T17:19:56Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/38782
dc.descriptionINNOVATIONS IN HUMAN SYSTEMS INTEGRATION TRAINING AND EDUCATION OF FUTURE PRACTITIONERS Lawrence G. Shattuck One mark of a healthy discipline or profession is the dynamic interplay between practitioners and the training and educational institutions that prepare the practitioners. An example of this interplay is when students and faculty engage in innovative research that pushes the boundaries of a discipline and practitioners can use the results of the research. Similarly, the innovations of the practitioners are passed back to the training and educational institutions where they are incorporated into the coursework.en_US
dc.description.abstractHuman Systems Integration principles and methods can be used to help integrate people, technology, and organizations in an effective and efficient manner. Over the past decade, a wide range of tools, techniques, and technologies have been developed by federal agencies to achieve significant cost and performance benefits. In this discussion, we will explore trends in military human systems integration and learn about the critical role being played by human performance and effectiveness research. We will also examine case studies on the planning and design of future human space flight vehicles, the national air space system and the first nuclear reactors to be built in the United States in over 30 years. And with an eye toward sustaining the discipline’s principles and methods, we’ll take a look at educating and training the next generation of human systems integration practitioners.en_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United Statesen_US
dc.titleHuman Systems Integration in the Federal Governmenten_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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