Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Thomas H.
dc.contributor.authorMason, M. Chris
dc.dateSpring 2008
dc.date.accessioned2014-02-10T19:10:48Z
dc.date.available2014-02-10T19:10:48Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifier.citationInternational Security, V. 32, no. 4, Spring 2008, pp. 41-77.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/38801
dc.descriptionThis article explores the reasons why religious and political extremism in the Pakistan-Afghanistan border region ends neatly at the borders of the Pashtun lands. It begins with a brief overview of the geography and typography of the border, followed by a condensed study of the key ethnographic and cultural factors. An understanding of the tribal and social framework of the border, particularly its alternative forms of governance, is critical to the subsequent discussion of the current instability and radicalization. In addition to religion, tribal mores that predate Islam shape insurgent behavior and should inform all aspects of engagement on both sides of the border. The article concludes with an examination of the history and the unintended consequences of border politics, and offers policy recommendations to begin to reverse the ongoing slide into Talibanization.en_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleNo sign until the burst of fire: understanding the Pakistan-Afghanistan frontieren_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School, Monterey, California
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs (NSA)


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record