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dc.contributor.authorTsypkin, Mikhail
dc.date.accessioned2014-02-10T21:49:45Z
dc.date.available2014-02-10T21:49:45Z
dc.date.issued2009-12-10
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/38808
dc.descriptionThe gestation period for the Russian draft Treaty of European Security was unusually long. Newly elected Dmitry Medvedev announced on May 8, 2008, that he was going to come up with a new plan for European security, and the draft treaty was only published on November 30, 2009...the invitation to alliances and international organizations to become signatories has two objectives. One is to strengthen the legitimacy of the weak organizations founded and supported by Russia (the CIS (Commonwealth of Indepedent States) and CSTO (Collective Security Treaty Organization). The other goal is to dilute somewhat the collective security obligations of NATO members. According to the draft treaty, the policies of existing "military alliances" are not supposed to impact negatively the security of other parties. It is not clear at all how the approval of the treaty by alliances/organization would affect the relationships of their members vis-a-vis the treaty.en_US
dc.publisherRadio Free Europe/Radio Libertyen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. As such, it is in the public domain, and under the provisions of Title 17, United States Code, Section 105, may not be copyrighted.en_US
dc.titleMoscow's European security gambiten_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School, Monerey, California
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs (NSA)


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