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dc.contributor.advisorNaegle, Brad
dc.contributor.advisorKang, Keebom
dc.contributor.authorBurgess, Nathan P.
dc.contributor.authorJordan, Keith A.
dc.dateDec-13
dc.date.accessioned2014-02-18T23:38:38Z
dc.date.available2014-02-18T23:38:38Z
dc.date.issued2013-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/38889
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution is unlimited.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis research project is intended to determine if utility modeling could be used within the Department of Defense acquisition community. The primary effort of this research is to create a linear programming-based utility model that could assist a program manager in making purchase decisions. The final solution, given all available data regarding cost, schedule impacts, unique program constraints, and quality factors will be the optimal allocation of budgetary resources to achieve the best overall value for the end user and taxpayer. Data for this research were obtained from the Apache Block III Modernization Program after which a utility model was created to assess the utility of linear programming in the DoD acquisition decision-making process. The model compared 16 unique potential upgrades from the Apache Block III Modernization Program against each other and determined an optimal solution given the unique conditions of the program. Utility modeling proved to be an effective tool to help program managers make better purchase decisions. Utility modeling, coupled with sensitivity analysis, weighted utility modeling, and decision support analysis, has the ability to optimize resource allocation decisions thus maximizing overall value and reducing waste. This research project identified opportunities for further exploration into project management forecasting, game theory and retroactive program analysis.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/applyingndmeasur1094538889
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. As such, it is in the public domain, and under the provisions of Title 17, United States Code, Section 105, may not be copyrighted.en_US
dc.titleApplying and measuring the value of utility modeling in defense acquisition decision makingen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentGraduate School of Business & Public Policy (GSBPP)
dc.subject.authorAcquisitionen_US
dc.subject.authorApache Block IIIen_US
dc.subject.authorEvolutionary Acquisitionen_US
dc.subject.authorBlock Upgradesen_US
dc.subject.authorInteger Programmingen_US
dc.subject.authorLinear Programmingen_US
dc.subject.authorMajor Defense Acquisition Programen_US
dc.subject.authorMultiple Criteria Decision Makingen_US
dc.subject.authorProgram Manageren_US
dc.subject.authorProgram Managementen_US
dc.subject.authorQuality Index Scoreen_US
dc.subject.authorRetroactive Program Analysisen_US
dc.subject.authorUtility Modelen_US
dc.subject.authorWeighted Utility Modelingen_US
dc.description.serviceCaptain, United States Armyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster Of Business Administrationen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineBusiness Administrationen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US


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