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dc.contributor.advisorMiller, Alice
dc.contributor.authorChang, FuWei
dc.dateDec-13
dc.date.accessioned2014-02-18T23:38:42Z
dc.date.available2014-02-18T23:38:42Z
dc.date.issued2013-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/38897
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution is unlimited.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe 9/11 terrorist attack remains one of the darkest moments in American history and has had a great impact on the global strategic relationship in the beginning of the twenty-first century. To respond to this incident, Taiwan and the United States exchanged information and intelligence and signed the Sino-American Mutual Legal Assistance Treaty, which represents Taiwans willingness to participate in and cooperate with the international community in regards to information exchange, security, and anti-money laundering activities and in strengthening an emergency response mechanism. At the time, the Taiwanese government, under the idea of Taiwan needs to have what others have, established a Counterterrorism Office in January 2004, which was reorganized as the Office of Homeland Security in 2007. The Office of Homeland Security does not directly carry out intelligence gathering and counter-terrorism tasks. Instead, it combines intelligence from different intelligence apparatuses for further research, analysis, and lateral communication and consultation. The purpose of this thesis is to assess whether this two-track mechanismthe separation of intelligence and response systemscan respond efficiently to a major terrorist attack and whether a comparison of the approaches and experience of the United States and Japan offers useful insight into how to organize Taiwans system.en_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. As such, it is in the public domain, and under the provisions of Title 17, United States Code, Section 105, may not be copyrighted.en_US
dc.titleThe study of counterterrorism mechanisms in Taiwanen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.secondreaderWeiner, Robert
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs
dc.subject.authorCounterterrorism Mechanismsen_US
dc.subject.authorNational Security Affairsen_US
dc.subject.authorIntelligenceen_US
dc.subject.authorAnti- Terrorist Action Lawen_US
dc.description.serviceLieutenant Colonel, Taiwan Military Policeen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster Of Arts In Security Studies (Combating Terrorism: Policy & Strategy)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineSecurity Studies (Combating Terrorism: Policy & Strategy)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US


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