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dc.contributor.advisorNussbaun, Daniel
dc.contributor.advisorYoder, Elliot Cory
dc.contributor.authorChoi, Yeong Sam M.
dc.contributor.authorMorneault, Jason A.
dc.contributor.authorPoole, Daniel J.
dc.dateDec-13
dc.date.accessioned2014-02-18T23:38:43Z
dc.date.available2014-02-18T23:38:43Z
dc.date.issued2013-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/38900
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution is unlimited.en_US
dc.description.abstractOn May 22, 2009, President Barack Obama signed into law the Weapons Systems Acquisition Reform Act (WSARA). The intent of this law is to reform acquisition processes, control unsustainable cost growth, and make programs more affordable. In 2010, despite WSARA, program cost, schedule overruns, and less-than-desirable performance were still prevalent in DoD acquisition. In response, Ashton Carter, Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology, and Logistics (USD[AT&L]), issued his Better Buying Power (BBP) memorandum directing the implementation of Should-Cost Management (SCM). In April 2011, Carter issued an additional directive that should-cost estimates would be required for all acquisition category (ACAT) programs and that SCM initiative progress would be briefed at every milestone review. In November 2012, Frank Kendall, Carters successor, issued an update to the original BBP initiative (BBPi), reinforcing the success of the BBPi. Kendalls update incorporated lessons learned from two years of implementation and feedback from the acquisition workforce. Our case study examines how the Army has implemented SCM as part of the BBPi. We analyze actions taken from the program manager to the Army acquisition executive using Program Executive Office (PEO) Aviation as our case study focus.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/casestudyofusarm1094538900
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. As such, it is in the public domain, and under the provisions of Title 17, United States Code, Section 105, may not be copyrighted.en_US
dc.titleCase study of the U.S. Army's should-cost management implementationen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentGraduate School of Business & Public Policy (GSBPP)
dc.subject.authorProject managementen_US
dc.subject.authorweapon systemsen_US
dc.subject.authormilitary procurementen_US
dc.subject.authorcost overrunsen_US
dc.subject.authormilitary acquisitionen_US
dc.subject.authorefficiencyen_US
dc.description.serviceMajor, United States Armyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster Of Business Administrationen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineBusiness Administrationen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US


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