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dc.contributor.advisorAten, Kathryn
dc.contributor.advisorBrinkley, Douglas
dc.contributor.authorCiarcia, Jason C.
dc.dateDec-13
dc.date.accessioned2014-02-18T23:38:44Z
dc.date.available2014-02-18T23:38:44Z
dc.date.issued2013-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/38903
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution is unlimited.en_US
dc.description.abstractWhy individuals adopt or resist technologies is a central question in technology management and energy conservation research. Much academic attention focuses on functional and economic advantages, but perceptions, habits, and norms play a more substantial role and are a particularly strong driver of resistance. Recognizing this, the Marine Corps Expeditionary Energy Office has called for research to better understand how messaging and behavioral factors will influence the shaping of a combat-effective energy posture within the Marine Corps. This research examines how particular individual attributes may affect Marines assessments of energy-efficient technologies. Drawing on a framework developed from the academic literature, this research focuses on the impact of a persons prior conditions, knowledge, and perception of technologies on the decision to adopt, postpone, or resist new technologies. The research produced a summary of extant findings and implications for the United States Marine Corps concerning the typology of United States Marines perceptions and willingness to adopt energy-efficient technologies. The research findings may offer the Marine Corps a clearer understanding of acceptance and resistance drivers, and the means to facilitate greater acceptance of energy-efficient technologies.en_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. As such, it is in the public domain, and under the provisions of Title 17, United States Code, Section 105, may not be copyrighted.en_US
dc.titleKey drivers of Marines' willingness to adopt energy-efficient technologiesen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentGraduate School of Business & Public Policy (GSBPP)
dc.subject.authorMarine Corps Expeditionary Officeen_US
dc.subject.authorenergy-efficient technologiesen_US
dc.subject.authortechnology resistance drivers and technology acceptance drivers.en_US
dc.description.serviceCaptain, United States Marine Corpsen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster Of Business Administrationen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineBusiness Administrationen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US


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