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dc.contributor.advisorLooney, Robert
dc.contributor.authorCulpepper, Timothy M.
dc.dateDec-13
dc.date.accessioned2014-02-18T23:38:48Z
dc.date.available2014-02-18T23:38:48Z
dc.date.issued2013-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/38912
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution is unlimited.en_US
dc.description.abstractFrom 1961 to the present, Ghanas gross domestic product (GDP) change deviated significantly (more than 5.8 percent) from that of the region eight times; of these eight deviations, four were positive, outperforming the region, and four were negative, underperforming the region. This study utilizes process tracing in order to test whether economic policiesprotectionist and liberalhad any impact on those deviations. This study shows that every negative deviation year was preceded by protectionist policies, and, with one exception (explained by currency devaluation), every positive deviation year was preceded by economic liberalization policies. This relationship suggests that the nature of economic policies (liberal versus protectionist) do not necessarily cause large, acute GDP movement, but they may be prerequisites for significant GDP movement in any given year.en_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. As such, it is in the public domain, and under the provisions of Title 17, United States Code, Section 105, may not be copyrighted.en_US
dc.titleThe Ghanaian economic recoveryen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.secondreaderMabry, Tristan
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs
dc.subject.authorGhanaen_US
dc.subject.authoreconomyen_US
dc.subject.authorstructural adjustmenten_US
dc.subject.authoreconomic reformen_US
dc.subject.authorIMFen_US
dc.description.serviceMajor, United States Armyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster Of Arts In Security Studies (Middle East, South Asia, And Sub-saharan Africa)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineSecurity Studies (Middle East, South Asia, And Sub-saharan Africa)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US


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