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dc.contributor.advisorTsypkin, Mikhail
dc.contributor.advisorClement, Victoria
dc.contributor.authorMayer, Timothy R.
dc.dateDec-13
dc.date.accessioned2014-02-18T23:39:07Z
dc.date.available2014-02-18T23:39:07Z
dc.date.issued2013-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/38976
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution is unlimited.en_US
dc.description.abstractNearly two decades following a ceasefire, the conflict between Armenia and Azerbaijan over the disputed territory of Nagorno-Karabakh remains unresolved. Often referred to as a frozen conflict, the status quo that has developed between these two nations has developed roots that touch many aspects of life in both countries. This thesis examines intractability by analyzing three distinct levels of this conflict. It scrutinizes the reasons underlying failed mediation attempts since 1994 at the level of the elite, the nation, and the international structure. It also explores the linkages between these three distinct levels that contribute to the complexity of conflict resolution. Despite periodic optimistic media reports that suggest mediators are nearing a final resolution, it will likely be decades before real progress can be made. Resolution of this conflict will require a compromise between these two nations that may only be possible through greater democratization on both sides. Simultaneously, the influence of larger states, notably Russia, have placed this regional dispute on the global stage and embedded the conflict in a larger polarized geopolitical contest for power and influence. Effective mediation depends on a shift in the regional balance of power or national interests of regional stakeholders.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/intractabilitynd1094538976
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. As such, it is in the public domain, and under the provisions of Title 17, United States Code, Section 105, may not be copyrighted.en_US
dc.titleIntractability and mediation of the Nagorno-Karabakh conflicten_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs
dc.subject.authorNagorno-Karabakhen_US
dc.subject.authorArmeniaen_US
dc.subject.authorAzerbaijanen_US
dc.subject.authorSouth Caucasusen_US
dc.subject.authorintractable conflicten_US
dc.subject.authormediationen_US
dc.subject.authorfrozen conflicten_US
dc.subject.authorformer Soviet Unionen_US
dc.subject.authorOSCEen_US
dc.subject.authorMinsk Groupen_US
dc.description.recognitionOutstanding Thesisen_US
dc.description.serviceMajor, United States Marine Corpsen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameMaster Of Arts In Security Studies (Europe And Eurasia)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineSecurity Studies (Europe And Eurasia)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US


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