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dc.contributor.authorBaylouny, Anne Marie
dc.date.accessioned2014-02-20T18:59:52Z
dc.date.available2014-02-20T18:59:52Z
dc.date.issued2004-03
dc.identifier.citationConnections III, N. 1(March 2004): 41-47.
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/39052
dc.description.abstractIn recent years violent movements in the name of Islam have been catapulted to center stage in U.S. foreign policy concerns. However, before concrete strategies can be formulated to deal with this phenomenon, the nature and dynamics of Islamist mobilization itself must be understood·' What motivates an individual to join an lslamist group and possibly engage in violence? Under what conditions will these groups moderate their stances, and when will they radicalize? While our policy choices dealing with the Muslim world and international terrorism inevitably hinge on our answers to these questions, a serious application of theory has been lacking.en_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleEmotions, Poverty, or Politics? Misconceptions about Islamist Movementsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs


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