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dc.contributor.authorRamp, Steven R.
dc.contributor.authorGarwood, Roland W.
dc.contributor.authorDavis, Curtiss O.
dc.contributor.authorSnow, Richard L.
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-04T19:57:26Z
dc.date.available2014-03-04T19:57:26Z
dc.date.issued1991-08
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 96, No. C8, Pages 14,947 - 14,957, August 15, 1991
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/39267
dc.description.abstractThe difference between the temperature of the ocean at 4-cm and 2-m depth was continuously monitored during a cruise to the coastal transition zone off Point Arena, California (38°58'N, 123°45'W), during June 1987. The two temperatures were coincident most of the time but diverged during one nearshore leg of the cruise where large temperature differences (~D of up to 4.7°C were observed between the 4-cm and 2-m sensors, in areas which were separated by regions where the two temperatures were coincident as usual. The spatial scale of this "patchy" thermal structure was about 5-10 km. The Naval Postgraduate School mixed layer model (Garwood, 1977) was used to simulate the near surface stratification when forced by the observed wind stress, surface heating, and optical clarity of the water. The model produced a thin strongly stratified surface layer at stations where exceptionally high turbidity was observed but did not produce such features otherwise. This simple model could not explain the horizontal patchiness in the thermal structure, which was likely due to patchiness in the near-surface chlorophyll distributions or to submesoscale variability of the surface wind stress.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThe field work was funded by the U.S. Office of Naval Research (ONR) Coasta,I Sciences Program, Code I 122CS, as part of the Coastal Transition Zone project. S.R.R. re- ceived additional support from Direct Research Funding at the U.S. Naval Postgraduate School (NPS). The portion of this work carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, was sponsored by ONR and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Model simulatiotis were conducted by the Oceanic Planetary Boundary Layer Laboratory, sponsored by ONR and funded by NPS. The boom probe was designed and built by the Oceanography Department support staff at the Naval Postgraduate School. Paul Jessen assisted with the data collection and processing. The satellite image was provided by Toby Garfield and the NPS Interactive Digital Environmental Analysis (IDEA) Laboratory.en_US
dc.publisherJournal of Geophysical Researchen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. As such, it is in the public domain, and under the provisions of Title 17, United States Code, Section 105, may not be copyrighted.en_US
dc.titleSurface Heating and Patchiness in the Coastal Ocean off Central California During a Wind Relaxation Eventen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentOceanography


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