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dc.contributor.advisorGaver, Donald P.
dc.contributor.advisorJacobs, Patricia A.
dc.contributor.authorStoneman, James G.
dc.dateSeptember 1998
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-10T16:59:24Z
dc.date.available2014-03-10T16:59:24Z
dc.date.issued1998-09
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/39326
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution is unlimited.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis thesis illustrates the use of simulation techniques to evaluate the satisfaction of suitability requirements for a mobile platform carrying payload (for example, an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle with sensors) on a military mission (surveillance or reconnaissance). The Institute for Defense Analyses, in support of Director, Operational Test & Evaluation (DOT&E), recently developed a simulation to assist in the analysis of the PREDATOR Unmanned Aerial Vehicle. That simulation has been extended to make it more applicable to a variety of platforms, and the extended simulation has been incorporated into the Military Aircraft Sustainability Simulation (MASS). The primary output from the simulation is Effective Time On Station (ETOS). ETOS is the long-run percentage of time that the region under surveillance is being covered by at least one operating platform. An analytical model for a single platform also has been developed to augment and assist in verifying the MASS. This thesis shows that MASS can be an invaluable tool for evaluating a platform's suitability for a mission. The Simulation can assist during the acquisition process, when the government must decide whether to buy a platform, and the simulation can assist in determining the most effective way to deploy such platforms once they are in use.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/operationalnalys1094539326
dc.format.extentxvi, 61 p.;28 cm.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California: Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. As such, it is in the public domain, and under the provisions of Title 17, United States Code, Section 105, may not be copyrighted.en_US
dc.titleOperational analysis of the sustainability of a mobile military platformen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School (U.S.)
dc.description.serviceU.S. Navy (U.S.N.) author.en_US
dc.identifier.oclca205412
etd.thesisdegree.nameM.S. in Operations Researchen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineOperations Researchen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US


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