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dc.contributor.advisorBrannan, David
dc.contributor.advisorMiller, Patrick
dc.contributor.authorBiasotti, Michael C.
dc.dateSeptember 2011
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-11T22:36:21Z
dc.date.available2014-03-11T22:36:21Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/39405
dc.descriptionCHDS State/Localen_US
dc.descriptionIncludes supplementary materialen_US
dc.description.abstractAs a result of the events of September 11, 2001, law enforcement agencies nationwide have been assigned a plethora of terrorism prevention and recovery related duties. Many federal documents outline and emphasize duties and responsibilities pertaining to local law enforcement. The prevention of acts of terrorism within communities has become a focal point of patrol activities for state and local police agencies. Simultaneously, local law enforcement is dealing with the unintended consequences of a policy change that in effect removed the daily care of our nation's severely mentally ill population from the medical community and placed it with the criminal justice system. This policy change has caused a spike in the frequency of arrests of severely mentally ill persons, prison and jail population and the homeless population. A nationwide survey of 2,406 senior law enforcement officials conducted within this paper indicates that the deinstitutionalization of the severely mentally ill population has become a major consumer of law enforcement resources nationwide. This paper argues that highly cost-effective policy recommendations exist that would assist in correcting the current situation, which is needlessly draining law enforcement resources nationwide, thereby allowing sorely needed resources to be directed toward this nation's homeland security concerns.en_US
dc.description.urihttp://archive.org/details/managementofseve1094539405
dc.format.extentxvi, 137 p. : col. ill. ;en_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsCopyright is reserved by the copyright owner.en_US
dc.subject.lcshLaw enforcementen_US
dc.subject.lcshMentally illen_US
dc.subject.lcshCivil defenseen_US
dc.subject.lcshUnited Statesen_US
dc.titleManagement of the severely mentally ill and its effects on homeland securityen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School (U.S.)
dc.contributor.departmentNational Security Affairs (NSA)
dc.subject.authorlaw enforcementen_US
dc.subject.authorsevere mental illnessen_US
dc.subject.authorhomeland securityen_US
dc.subject.authorlaw enforcement resourcesen_US
dc.subject.authorassisted out-patient treatmenten_US
dc.subject.authorhomeless populationen_US
dc.subject.authorprison overcrowdingen_US
dc.subject.authorNew Windsor Police Departmenten_US
dc.description.recognitionOutstanding Thesisen_US
dc.identifier.oclc760107883
etd.thesisdegree.nameM.A.en_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineSecurity Studies (Homeland Security and Defense)en_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
etd.verifiednoen_US
dc.description.distributionstatementApproved for public release; distribution is unlimited.


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