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dc.contributor.advisorMurphree, James Thomas.
dc.contributor.advisorChu, Peter C.
dc.contributor.authorKent, John E.
dc.dateDecember 1993
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-26T23:22:54Z
dc.date.available2014-03-26T23:22:54Z
dc.date.issued1993-12
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/39703
dc.descriptionApproved for public release; distribution is unlimited.en_US
dc.description.abstractWe have investigated air-sea interaction patterns in the equatorial Pacific during the 1991-1992 El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) event. Our study focused on the identification of spatial and temporal relationships between sea surface temperatures, subsurface temperatures, and winds. These relationships were examined using time series and statistical analyses of atmosphere and ocean data from the moored buoys of the Tropical Oceans-Global Atmosphere (TOGA) program. Our results strongly suggest that the heat content of the ocean mixed layer greatly affected air-sea interactions. In almost all regions, mixed layer warming was followed within one week by increased winds. In most cases, the mixed layer warming before wind events was accompanied by a thickening of the mixed layer, suggesting that internal waves were strongly influencing air-sea interactions. Increased winds tended to precede surface cooling and subsurface warming by a few days. There were strong correlations between warming (cooling) thermocline temperature and increased (decreased) zonal winds at the central and eastern equatorial Pacific buoys. In the central Pacific, thermocline warming (cooling) was associated with westerlies (easterlies). This suggested that equatorially trapped Kelvin waves warmed and thickened the mixed layer, resulting in increased zonal winds. In the central Pacific, these local zonal winds then reinforced the Kelvin waves through downwelling and upwelling. Ocean temperature inversions were found throughout the Pacific.en_US
dc.format.extent191 p.en_US
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherMonterey, California. Naval Postgraduate Schoolen_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. As such, it is in the public domain, and under the provisions of Title 17, United States Code, Section 105, may not be copyrighted.en_US
dc.titleAir-sea interaction patterns in the equatorial Pacificen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School (U.S.)
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Meteorology
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Oceanography
dc.subject.authorMixed layeren_US
dc.subject.authorKelvin wavesen_US
dc.subject.authorTurbulent kinetic energyen_US
dc.subject.authorBuoyancy dampingen_US
dc.subject.authorTropical cycloneen_US
dc.subject.authorEl Ninoen_US
dc.subject.authorENSOen_US
dc.subject.authorHeat contenten_US
dc.subject.authorThermoclineen_US
dc.subject.authorAir-sea interactionen_US
dc.subject.authorEquatorial Pacificen_US
dc.subject.authorOcean temperature inversionsen_US
dc.subject.authorTOGAen_US
dc.subject.authorBarrier-layeren_US
dc.description.serviceLieutenant Commander, United States Navyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameM.S. in Meteorologyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.nameM.S. in Physical Oceanographyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.levelMastersen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplineMeteorologyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.disciplinePhysical Oceanographyen_US
etd.thesisdegree.grantorNaval Postgraduate Schoolen_US


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