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dc.contributor.authorRobert, Nancy C.
dc.date.accessioned2014-04-07T17:03:45Z
dc.date.available2014-04-07T17:03:45Z
dc.date.issued2003-09
dc.identifier.citationPaper to be presented to the 7th National Public Management Research Conference, October 9-11, Georgetown University, Washington D.C.
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10945/40260
dc.description.abstractThe subject of citizen participation has a long lineage dating back to the Greek city-states. Two questions have been central to its history: Who is a citizen and how should the citizen participate in governance? Responses to these questions have varied depending on the political and administrative theory one champions. Those who value indirect citizenship participation, or representative democracy, cite the dangers, costs, and logistical difficulties of involving all members of a society. Those who value direct citizenship participation cite increased state legitimacy and the benefits of social learning when all citizens are involved...en_US
dc.rightsThis publication is a work of the U.S. Government as defined in Title 17, United States Code, Section 101. Copyright protection is not available for this work in the United States.en_US
dc.titleDirect Citizen Participation: Building a Theoryen_US
dc.typeConference Paperen_US
dc.contributor.corporateNaval Postgraduate School (U.S.)
dc.contributor.departmentStrategic Management


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